Tuesday, January 31, 2006

How Alito was nominated.

It turns out that a bunch of people close to the Fedralist Society had a plan all along to get people like Alito on to the Supreme court. They hired PR firms to cultivate and manage public opinion to favorably suit potential justices like Alito. Ted Kennedy is mad about this. The NY Times article Kennedy is waving about is here. It may require a subscription, so here are some excerpts...

The team recruited conservative lawyers to study the records of 18 potential nominees — including Judges John G. Roberts Jr. and Samuel A. Alito Jr. — and trained more than three dozen lawyers across the country to respond to news reports on the president's eventual pick. "We boxed them in," one lawyer present during the strategy meetings said with pride in an interview over the weekend. This lawyer and others present who described the meeting were granted anonymity because the meetings were confidential and because the team had told its allies not to exult publicly until the confirmation vote was cast. Now, on the eve of what is expected to be the Senate confirmation of Judge Alito to the Supreme Court, coming four months after Chief Justice Roberts was installed, those planners stand on the brink of a watershed for the conservative movement. In 1982, the year after Mr. Alito first joined the Reagan administration, that movement was little more than the handful of legal scholars who gathered at Yale for the first meeting of the Federalist Society, a newly formed conservative legal group. Judge Alito's ascent to join Chief Justice Roberts on the court "would have been beyond our best expectations," said Spencer Abraham, one of the society's founders, a former secretary of energy under President Bush and now the chairman of the Committee for Justice, one of many conservative organizations set up to support judicial nominees. He added, "I don't think we would have put a lot of money on it in a friendly wager." Judge Alito's confirmation is also the culmination of a disciplined campaign begun by the Reagan administration to seed the lower federal judiciary with like-minded jurists who could reorient the federal courts toward a view of the Constitution much closer to its 18th-century authors' intent, including a much less expansive view of its application to individual rights and federal power. It was a philosophy promulgated by Edwin Meese III, attorney general in the Reagan administration, that became the gospel of the Federalist Society and the nascent conservative legal movement.
So they are trying to attack an individual's rights after all. Well, I should have guessed as much. Bush's whole presidency has been about expanding his powers well past where they were, and way past where they should be.

1 Comments:

At 2/12/2006 02:12:00 PM, Blogger elliot said...

I would have been happy with someone to the left of Alito on most matters...if they were in favor of reversing Roe.

Maybe you can explain to me why the left is so eager to find "rights" that are not in the Constitution while working so hard to deny the Second Amendment which clearly IS in the Constitution.

(Nice blog, by the way.)

 

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